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Redesigning Wellness Podcast

The Redesigning Wellness podcast explores the world of corporate health to help employers build strategic wellness programs that engage employees. The Redesigning Wellness podcast is centered around what works and doesn’t work in wellness. In this podcast, Jen will interview experts in various worksite wellness specialties to demystify the common worksite wellness program. She’ll also spend time sharing common barriers to help get your wellness program moving forward. You’ll discover common sense approaches to wellness, tips for engaging employees and how to implement a program that your employees actually like.
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Now displaying: 2019
Dec 18, 2019

The practice of conducting research and translating that research into meaningful best practices is one of the foundations and drivers of moving the wellness industry forward. Today’s guest, Karen Moseley, is the president of the Health Enhancement Research Organization (HERO), which strives to do just that.

HERO is a national nonprofit think tank dedicated to providing leadership in research and education on issues such as the impact of wellness program best practices on health outcomes for employees, their spouses, dependents, and their wider communities.

Karen has been at the helm of this organization for almost a year, growing HERO membership, increasing member engagement, and continuously improving educational programming and supporting HERO’s robust research agenda.

In today’s episode, Karen provides some background information on HERO, as well as some changes she’s noticed in the wellness industry and how the organization is adapting to and furthering that change. She talks about what prompted her Linkedin post calling for open dialogue, and the feedback she received including connecting to Jen.

Karen discusses her thoughts on the current challenges the industry faces, as well as what industry movement she’s most excited about. She also shares her knowledge of Social Determinants of Health and how these factors affect the current workforce as well as the future talent of a community.

Finally, Karen talks about what she hopes to accomplish as president of HERO, what things are on the horizon for HERO in 2020, and lastly leaves us with a tangible tip to creating a successful wellness approach in any organization.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Dec 11, 2019

Another year has almost passed, which means it’s time for Jen’s annual chat with wellness colleague, Bob Merberg. It’s so easy to forget what happened this year so join Jen and Bob as they chat about what happened in wellness in 2019 and what we can look forward to on the horizon for next year.

Bob Merberg, innovator and founder of consulting company Jozito LLC, has been enhancing employee experience and optimizing business results through wellness for more than 20 years.

He specializes in qualitative and quantitative assessment and analysis of organizational needs, Total Worker Health strategies, and job crafting workshops and consultation. He has been featured multiple times in publications such as HR Executive Magazine, MarketWatch, and Wellbeing Practitioner.

In today’s episode, Jen and Bob discuss the recent Harvard Song study, as well as the 2019 Yale and MIT wellness lawsuits, and other occupational studies done this year. Each weigh in on their opinions and reservations about the year’s three major wellness trends in hot topics - loneliness, burnout, and mental health. They talk about how each of their perspectives have changed a bit in 2019, and what things have them excited for the new year. 

Finally, they each share a podcast recommendation for wellness professionals that they personally have been enjoying and discuss personal goals they’re looking forward to achieving in 2020.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Dec 4, 2019

What comes first, the leader or the wellness professional? According to today’s guest, Renee Moorefield, “a leader is someone who sees themself as stewarding the potential of their team, and that means human wellbeing.” 

Renee Moorefield, co-founder and CEO of Wisdom Works, is uniquely poised to evaluate and strengthen leadership through the lens of wellness. Having started out in the wellness industry as an exercise physiologist, she quickly realized that she had more influence on creating and altering environments for maximum wellness as a formal leader, then later as an executive coach. 

Through Wisdom Works, Renee has trained and advised thousands of leaders and executives striving to elevate human potential, operate from inspired purpose and vision, and achieve wellbeing and internal balance. She is the director of the transformational leadership platform Be Well Lead Well, chair of the Wellness at Work initiative at the Global Wellness Institute, and curator of the Wellness Moonshot, an effort to rid the world of preventable disease.

In today’s episode, Renee discusses the philosophy of Wisdom Works as well as her definition of thriving and how integral a concept it is to leadership and wellness. She shares some of the ways she’s seen executives’ views of wellness changing, especially how she believes leadership and wellness go hand in hand. 

Additionally, she illustrates how important mental wellbeing has become a part of the wellness conversation. Renee explains a bit of the creation process of the Be Well Lead Well Pulse, including its 6 measurable dimensions - thriving, fuel, flow, wonder, wisdom, and thriving amplified. Finally, she shares her biggest hope for wellness professionals.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Nov 27, 2019

Whether you feel shoved by the universe or have that insistent excitement in the back of your mind, starting a business is like stepping into completely uncharted territory.  In this episode, Jen and today’s guest, Maggie Gough attempt to give you the lay of the land by sharing their own journeys into entrepreneurship.

Maggie, founder, and CEO of Realize Wellbeing had a rich career in the corporate wellness industry before branching out to start her own business in 2015. She’s on a mission to empower and embolden fellow wellness warriors, who through compassion, connection, and vulnerability, will change the landscape of work culture as we know it. Maggie has become a nationally recognized leader, dedicating her life to helping create workplaces that exude energy and innovation through their vibrant thriving employees. 

In this episode, Jen and Maggie have a candid discussion about entrepreneurship, including why they stepped away from the traditional job market and how their businesses and ideas have evolved over time. They take a look at how exactly their businesses are profitable and what things they might have done differently if they could go back to the beginning. 

They’re honest about the many challenges they’ve faced and continue to face, but also share the things they love about being their own bosses. Finally, they leave you with a few of their top pieces of advice for success if you’re planning to start your journey into entrepreneurship.

This episode is sponsored by Workplace Money Coach. Workplace Money Coach is offering a special Train-the-trainer promotion for their Living Paycheck to Purpose program. The Living Paycheck to Purpose program is comprised of four live workshops that take employees through a series of activities and thought-provoking discussions designed to help build positive money management behaviors.  

Head to workplacemoneycoach.com and schedule time to speak with Shane about this train-the-trainer 2020 promotion. Make sure you let him know that you listen to the Redesigning Wellness Podcast.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Nov 20, 2019

Serving 50,000 employees in 32 countries with a team of one is a setup that would be enough to make many wellness professionals run the other way. Today’s guest, Alli Cromartie, has risen to this challenge and more, filling in the absence of a wellness team through making relationships and connections with other departments in the company. 

Alli is the Global Wellness Leader at Ingersoll Rand where she oversees programming globally through strategy, design, implementation, and administration of Health Progress - the company’s employee wellbeing program. She serves a diverse population including manufacturing, sales, corporate associates, and distribution. She also recently co-founded the Working Moms Connection and serves on the Consumer Engagement Platform Committee for the Health Transformation Alliance.

In today’s podcast, Alli shares a bit about her background and how she transferred from working for a wellness vendor serving Ingersoll Rand to being employed by the company itself. She discusses some of the job complexities and her strategy of partnering with internal teams by helping connect the dots for why and how they play a part in supporting employee wellness. 

Alli gives us an example of when she met resistance with a department and the skills she used to break down the barriers she experienced, as well as her experience working with Operational Excellence, a department that helped her take a look at her own processes and how to optimize them. 

Alli shares some of her biggest wins, including connecting the wellness ambassador program to development in 2 of the company’s 7 core competency areas, as well as some of the biggest challenges she still faces - like answering the age old ROI questions pertaining to wellness. 

Finally, Alli dissects a few skills both natural and learned that she’s utilized in order to make the connections that have led to her success, and leaves us with a tangible tip on how we can start to experience the same successes.

This episode is sponsored by Workplace Money Coach. Workplace Money Coach is offering a special Train-the-trainer promotion for their Living Paycheck to Purpose program. The Living Paycheck to Purpose program is comprised of four live workshops that take employees through a series of activities and thought-provoking discussions designed to help build positive money management behaviors.  

Head to workplacemoneycoach.com and schedule time to speak with Shane about this train-the-trainer 2020 promotion. Make sure you let him know that you listen to the Redesigning Wellness Podcast.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Nov 13, 2019

Although we aim to impact adults in the workplace, our childhood experiences teach us how to cope with life and affect our overall health and wellness. Wellness programs often offer simple health solutions or use words that may be triggering for employees with adverse childhood experiences. How can we influence employee health when we don’t have the full picture of what an employee has been through in their life? 

Today’s guest, Diana Bishop, has done an extensive amount of work to understand the implications of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), how they affect adult health and wellness, and what strategies wellness professionals can use to work through ACEs rather than against them.

Diana is a Senior Learning Consultant, certified Health and Wellness Coach, and Life Care Planning instructor trainer for Kaiser Permanente, San Diego. With 20 years of experience working with ACEs, as well as personal experience understanding and working through childhood trauma, she is an industry expert on developing programs for people with high ACE scores and is dedicated to meeting employees where they’re at in their emotional journey, not just their health and wellness. 

In today’s episode, Diana shares not only her professional background but also her experience growing up as a child in a volatile home. She explains the origins of the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study and breaks down its implications including a higher risk of chronic disease and premature death.

Diana encourages wellness professionals to take a look at the language surrounding health initiatives and discusses some helpful strategies to avoid isolating and disengaging employees with high ACE scores. Lastly, she explains the benefit of tapping into employer groups to boost wellness programs and how important it is for wellness professionals to explore their own ACE score.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Nov 6, 2019

As a business coach for almost 20 years, it’s no surprise that today’s guest, Kerry Walls, began to notice some behavioral patterns differing between male and female executives and entrepreneurs. In response to this, she began coaching women leaders on how they may be getting in their own way on their career paths.

Kerry has spent the majority of her career focused on building family businesses and partnerships. She began as a coach in leadership development, eventually moving up to CEO before stepping away and founding her own company, Coaching Collaborative.

Her unique background in education, small business and counseling psychology fuels her approach to coaching high performing and high potential leaders allowing them to create breakthrough results in their businesses and careers.

In this episode, Kerry highlights the specific ways she noticed female executives getting in their own way on their paths to success. She takes us on a closer look at a few of these obstacles - not owning your own value, second-guessing yourself, and taking things too personally - while also giving some advice on building skills to overcome them.

She discusses the importance of learning to make requests, sharing your successes, and speaking up. Finally, Kerry shares a few tangible tips.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Oct 30, 2019

It’s nearly impossible to attend a wellness conference without seeing at least one speaker quoting Gallup data. But how does this industry go-to handle their own internal employee wellness programs? Today’s guest, Ryan Wolf, has been with Gallup’s wellness program since the beginning, currently serving as Physical Wellbeing Lead and touting more than 16 years with the company. He believes the main reason Gallup’s employee wellness programs are so successful is because the company’s core competency is employee engagement.

Ryan oversees “In the Zone” - Gallup’s internal wellness program that just passed 70% participation, providing associates, spouses, and family members with opportunities to pursue greater wellbeing by participating in health-related challenges and education. He is currently seeking a master’s in business administration and finds the most job enjoyment from creating new and engaging challenges that are modern and relevant to Gallup’s more than 1,100 employees.

In today’s episode, Ryan gives us a closer look at Gallup’s wellness program and the ways that it’s evolved over his time with the company. He explains how Gallup shifted from focusing exclusively on physical wellbeing to adding in the other four elements of wellbeing (career, social, financial, and community) into their programs as often as possible. He explains “In the Zone” and how Gallup is using gamification.

Ryan discusses his biggest challenges and a belief that he used to hold that doesn’t anymore, before sharing a bit about what he has planned for his Redesigning Wellness Academy talk. Finally, he leaves us with a tangible tip and what he believes is the most important element of a wellness program.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Oct 23, 2019

It’s no secret that one of the biggest hurdles in the wellness profession is finding the key to get employees motivated and engaged in our programs. But what if it’s not our job to be the active agent in engagement? Today’s guest, Scott Rigby, believes it's our job to understand that engagement is their decision. It’s our job to create the experiences and circumstances that are most likely to get them to engage and then stay engaged. 

As a behavioral scientist, author, founder of Immersyve Inc., and co-founder of Motivation Works, Scott has dedicated his life to working with both small and large companies to apply behavioral science to improve experiences, wellbeing, and performance among employees. His work encourages companies to use the proven principles of Self Determination Theory to drive greater wellness and engagement and also emphasizes the quantitative measurement of motivation and engagement. 

In this episode, Scott takes us into a deeper understanding of Self Determination Theory, our three basic psychological needs, and how we can use these things to drive authentic and lasting motivation and engagement in our clients. He explains the pitfalls of incentives and how they undermine intrinsic motivation.

Taking a closer look at intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, he explains how it’s not as black and white as some of the wellness industry believes. Lastly, he leaves us with a tangible tip and what he believes is one of the most important aspects of motivation.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Oct 16, 2019

As wellness professionals, we know that the shift into the next generation of wellness isn’t always an easy one. Maybe your organization or clients aren’t ready to ditch incentives and move away from a completely physical view of employee wellness. How can you help shift the wellness industry but start at a more agreeable place? This is one of the many reasons the Redesigning Wellness Academy (RWA) was created.

In today’s solo episode, Jen explains the top reasons that Redesigning Wellness Academy is a much-needed bridge for wellness professionals to begin moving their program or clients’ programs forward in the changing wellness landscape. She discusses Redesigning Wellness Academy in-depth, getting into the nitty-gritty of the RWA format, schedule, and what exactly you’ll get out of the 6-month program. 

If you’re looking for a program with a unique depth, a multi-dimensional focus, and a recipe of one part knowledge, one part skill, and one part support - the Redesigning Wellness Academy is for you. Registration is now open!

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Oct 9, 2019

As new health science continues to emerge, it’s imperative that we as wellness professionals allow our ideas and efforts to shift and change along with it. Today’s guest, Melanie Cumbee, has learned to embrace these changes with open arms throughout her 25 years in the wellness industry - encouraging moves away from biometrics and premium incentives toward an employee-centered wellness model that has caught the attention of WELCOA.

For the last 11 years, Melanie has led and developed the Good Life employee wellness program for MemorialCare Health Systems, which boasts an inspiring 75% participation among their 11,000 employees. Her passion for creating cultures that inspire and empower others to embrace their personal path to wellbeing, along with her excitement and willingness to implement emerging science into her programs, resulted in Melanie receiving the honor of being named WELCOA’s 2019 Top Health Promotion Professional in the US.

In today’s podcast, Melanie shares her journey as a wellness professional and how she got her start. She explores some strategies she’s used to encourage employees to prioritize self-care as well as her experiences partnering with other departments in order to enhance and expand a wellness program.

Melanie discusses some wellness industry practices she’s left behind, like biometric screenings, and others she’s altered to better work towards comprehensive wellness, like premium-based incentives. Finally, Melanie shares what keeps her going and engaged in her field of work, and her biggest tip for building culture change.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Oct 2, 2019

Knowing the people you’re engaging with is one of the biggest advantages you can have when trying to influence both inside or outside of an organization Today’s guest, Steven Sisler, has honed the art of reading people into a science. He suggests that understanding the personality of those you’re working with, as well as understanding your own personality, can give you a valuable advantage in communicating effectively and getting what you want in business settings. 

Steve is a behavioral analyst, speaker, author, and podcaster specializing in personality differences, leadership strategy, cultural differences, and temperament strategies. He has consulted for clients in more than 18 countries, gathering behavioral and attitudinal information on individuals within corporate settings and developing strategies for effective leadership, teamwork, and entrepreneurial success.

In today’s podcast, Steven explores not only why it’s advantageous for us to know what someone else is thinking and to understand their personality type, but also how understanding your own personality type can help you set yourself up for success. He uses his skills on Jen, demonstrating the scope and accuracy of his personality assessments and shares some information on the most common personalities as highlighted in his book, The 4 PeopleTypes: And What Drives Them.

Finally, Steven discusses strategies you can use to combat your own passiveness in meetings with executives and other leaders, and how executives commonly think and communicate.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Sep 25, 2019

As wellness professionals, one thing we’re constantly seeking is a seat at the table. Oftentimes, the path to this seat lies in developing and utilizing our leadership skills. Today’s guest, Sue Salvemini, believes that regardless of how many people we oversee, or what our job title is, we are all leaders. We can universally increase our effectiveness, impact, and ability to influence change with a commitment to 7 key leadership practices.

Sue is the founder and president of Focal Pointe Consulting Group, Inc and has been utilizing her more than 25 years of military and corporate experience to develop leaders, build teams, and launch products and businesses. As an executive coach and speaker, Sue works with individuals and teams to help them embrace their authentic leadership styles to maximize their positive impact on the people and organizations which they serve.

In this interview, Sue gives us insight as well as a few tips from her book, Leadership by Choice. She offers an in-depth look at each of her 7 key practices to help you tap into your own unique leadership style. Sue will have you inspired to step further into your leadership potential and increase your impact and the effectiveness within your organization.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Sep 18, 2019

Being an expert is highly regarded in the business world. After all, isn’t that why we went to school…to become an expert in our field of interest? As a wellness pro, we are often expected to flex our expert muscle when working with our employers and clients. After all, that’s what they pay us for, right? According to today’s guest, Sydney Finkelstein, our own expertise can be a trap that narrows our focus, makes us reluctant to admit mistakes and makes out of touch with new practices. 

Sydney Finkelstein is the Steven Roth Professor of Management at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. He’s listed at #23 on the “Thinkers 50,” the most prestigious ranking of management thinkers in the world, has published 26 books and 90+ articles and is a recognized thought leader on leadership, strategy, and corporate governance. Sydney is also host of his own podcast, the Sydcast.

In this interview, Sydney explains the downside of considering ourselves an expert and how it hinders our performance. We broach the subject of who’s responsible for our learning - us or our organizations. Sydney tells us the warning signs that we’ve fallen in the expert trap and how to get out of it. He then leaves us with some profound words of wisdom. 

Want to Increase your Impact? Accelerate your Leadership? Join me for Redesigning Wellness Academy!

As a wellness pro, it can feel like we’re swimming upstream. We’re trying to help employees take care of their wellbeing, convincing leadership that wellness is valuable to the organization and the headlines are screaming “wellness doesn’t work”. Let’s take the opportunity to tackle these challenges head on and evolve wellness to include more than physical health, connect to business priorities and grow our personal leadership skills.

To learn more about Redesigning Wellness Academy, click HERE.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Sep 11, 2019

In the worksite wellness industry, there is a divide between thought leaders when it comes to the question – does wellness work? Although this is too simple of a question to ask, recent research has fanned the flames of negative media headlines and contributed to further disagreement. Too often, organizations, consultants and wellness pros read the headlines and are even more confused about what actually works in wellness. 

Today’s guest, Nicole Latimer, believes this question is the biggest challenge we’re facing as an industry and she believes Staywell’s best practices work to move the needle on health. As chief executive officer of The StayWell Company, Nicole Latimer embodies the company’s mission to be the premier provider of lifestyle risk management programs for the entire healthcare ecosystem, leveraging the science of behavior change as the foundation for improving health outcomes.

In this interview, Nicole tells us about her background prior to Staywell and why she was drawn to Staywell’s mission. She explains Staywell’s wellness philosophy and gives her thoughts on how the wellness industry is evolving. We delve deeply into the topic of incentives, what we need to do differently with wellbeing and Nicole leaves us with her tangible tip.

This interview is one in which two people with different opinions have a civil conversation. If we’re ever going to evolve the wellness industry, we need more civil conversations about current and future wellness practices.

Want more?

Do you want a short summary of each week’s podcast? Each week, I send out an email that goes one step further than the interview. It’s my reflection of what I pulled out of the interview and at least one tip (and usually more) about how you can apply all the goodness to your work and life. If that sounds good, you can sign up HERE.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Sep 4, 2019

As wellness professionals we’re in a unique position to bring employees together. But as humans, we’re biased. We make stuff up about people all of the time. We do it at work on a daily basis. Even worse, our biases are rarely blatant. It’s usually subtle micro-behaviors that we often don’t notice. So, what can we do about it? 

Today’s guest, Howard Ross, is considered one of the world’s seminal thought leaders on identifying and addressing unconscious bias. Howard has delivered programs in 47 states and over 40 other countries to audiences including Fortune 500 companies, colleges and universities, and major institutions within healthcare, government, and non-profit sectors. His newest book, Our Search for Belonging: How the Need for Connection Is Tearing Our Culture Apart describes how to bridge the divide in our increasingly polarized society.

In this interview, Howard and I talk about what’s changed in the area of Diversity and Inclusion in the past 30 years and what hasn’t. He then explains that we all have unconscious bias (even him) and Howard explains what we can do about it. He makes the provocative statement that “Maslow was wrong” and that our need to belong trumps any other need. Finally, Howard leaves us with his tangible tip.

Want more?

Do you want a short summary of each week’s podcast? Each week, I send out an email that goes one step further than the interview. It’s my reflection of what I pulled out of the interview and at least one tip (and usually more) about how you can apply all the goodness to your work and life. If that sounds good, you can sign up HERE.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Aug 28, 2019

It’s no doubt that mental health is finally getting some of the attention it deserves. But many  employers and wellness pros are at a loss for how to address mental health in the workplace. Although it’s important to destigmatize mental health, for those who are suffering, talking about it is the most terrifying thing they can think of. Today’s guest, Justin Kruger, feels that if organizations solely try to identify mental health struggles first, they’ll fail.

Justin is the Founder and CEO of Project Helping, a Denver-based mental wellness organization. He played golf professionally before starting a career in the golf industry. His personal struggle with mental wellness led him to leave the golf business behind to start Project Helping and providing purpose, connection, and mental wellness through kyndfulness.

In this interview, Justin tells us about his story of his own challenges with mental health and when he discovered how helping others helped him dramatically (he calls it his therapy). He explains why if organizations identify mental health first, they’ll fail and what we need to do differently. Justin then explains KyndHub, an online community for sharing kindness. 

Want more?

Do you want a short summary of each week’s podcast? Each week, I send out an email that goes one step further than the interview. It’s my reflection of what I pulled out of the interview and at least one tip (and usually more) about how you can apply all the goodness to your work and life. If that sounds good, you can sign up HERE.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Aug 21, 2019

Senior executives have ranked talent shortages as a top organizational risk in 2019. According to today’s guest, Sydney Finkelstein, this is not a new concern but rather one organizations have faced over many decades. Instead of accepting the same answers to this perpetual question, Sydney researched a different question “what do the world’s greatest leaders do to find, develop and retain talent?” and put the answers in his book, Superbosses. 

Sydney Finkelstein is the Steven Roth Professor of Management at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. He’s listed at #23 on the “Thinkers 50,” the most prestigious ranking of management thinkers in the world, has published 26 books and 90+ articles and is a recognized thought leader on leadership, strategy, and corporate governance. Sydney is also host of his own podcast, the Sydcast. 

In this interview, Sydney tells us what got him interested in researching Superbosses, the three types and key elements they incorporate into their leadership. He tells us about some of their unconventional practices around hiring and talent, how organizations can aim for more Superbosses and how to seek out a Superboss to work for.

If you want to hear unconventional but effective leadership practices, learn how to become a better leader, tap into underutilized sources of talent and/or figure out how to find Superbosses within your organization, then this episode is for you!

Want more?

Do you want a short summary of each week’s podcast? Each week, I send out an email that goes one step further than the interview. It’s my reflection of what I pulled out of the interview and at least one tip (and usually more) about how you can apply all the goodness to your work and life. If that sounds good, you can sign up HERE.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Aug 14, 2019

A 2019 survey by PwC found that more employees than ever admitted to being stressed about their finances. It’s no surprise with 6 out of 10 US adults holding credit card debt (with nearly 2 in 5 carrying this debt from month to month) and 4 in 10 adults in America unable to cover a $400 emergency.   

As a response to these stats, many organizations are now rolling out financial wellness programs, opting to educate their employees on a wide variety of topics – from building an emergency savings to retirement. But is financial education on a wide variety of topics the way to go? According to today’s guest, Jirs Meuris, research doesn’t back this up.

Jirs Meuris is an Assistant Professor of Management and Human Resources and a faculty affiliate at the Institute for Research on Poverty and the Center for Financial Security at the Wisconsin School of Business (University of Wisconsin-Madison). Jirs looks at how work shapes people’s personal finances and the resulting consequences for individuals, organizations, and society. 

In this interview, Jirs walks us through his research across different industries, including a study that’s not yet published. He explains why financial education doesn’t work and offers thoughts on what we should do instead. This interview will definitely help you if you are having trouble making a case for bringing financial wellness solutions to your organization.

Want more?

Do you want a short summary of each week’s podcast? Each week, I send out an email that goes one step further than the interview. It’s my reflection of what I pulled out of the interview and at least one tip (and usually more) about how you can apply all the goodness to your work and life. If that sounds good, you can sign up HERE.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Aug 7, 2019

Imagine fleeing your home (and everything and everyone you know) to escape violence, persecution or disease outbreak. You move into a temporary refugee camp with the desire to safely live and work in another country, only to get stuck in a refugee camp for multiple years with no ability to work.

This is what’s happened to 70.8 million people around the world who have been forced from their home. But only 1% of this population will be resettled in a developed country like the US.

Today’s guest, Chris Chancey, founder of Amplio Recruiting, found a way to match the dependable refugee workforce with some of the 7 million open positions in the US that will go unfilled this year. So far, they have placed over 5,000 refugees living in the US into full time employment over the past 4 years. Amplio Recruiting has far surpassed the retention rate of the staffing industry norms and are a certified B corp.

In this interview, Chris tells us how he got the idea for Amplio and how they’re different than the average staffing company. He educates us on the refugee workforce, their strengths that makes them valuable employees and some enlightening stories of refugees they have placed. Chris leaves us with what employers can do to help the refugee workforce be successful at their companies. 

Want more?

Do you want a short summary of each week’s podcast? Each week, I send out an email that goes one step further than the interview. It’s my reflection of what I pulled out of the interview and at least one tip (and usually more) about how you can apply all the goodness to your work and life. If that sounds good, you can sign up HERE.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Jul 31, 2019

If you’re on top of big news in the worksite wellness world, you may have heard about employees suing Yale University because they allege the wellness program is not voluntary. That’s why wellness legal expert, Barbara Zabawa, is the perfect person to walk us through this class action lawsuit. 

Barbara Zabawa owns the Center for Health and Wellness Law, LLC a law firm dedicated to improving legal access and compliance for the health and wellness industries. She serves health and wellness professionals and organizations across the country as an advocate, a transactional lawyer and a compliance resource.

In today’s interview, Barbara first catches us up on the status of the EEOC wellness regulations around incentives that were vacated in January of 2019. Then we spend time going through the Yale lawsuit and Barbara’s perspective. She tells us how she would defend Yale and offers what other employers can take away from this lawsuit. 

Want more?

Do you want a short summary of each week’s podcast? Each week, I send out an email that goes one step further than the interview. It’s my reflection of what I pulled out of the interview and at least one tip (and usually more) about how you can apply all the goodness to your work and life. If that sounds good, you can sign up HERE.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Jul 24, 2019

Biometrics screenings are pervasive throughout the wellness industry, often as a foundational part of an employer’s full wellness program. Recently, there have been some (including myself) advocating for less screening and more resources allocated to other areas of wellbeing. But are screenings getting a bad rap? Podcast guest, Ann Sabbag, thinks so.

Ann founded Health Designs in 1995. The Health Designs team partners with diverse employers nationwide to create wellness programs that enhance employee health, improve productivity and build a culture of well-being. In 2018, the company served more than 85,000 employees at 250 companies nationwide.

In this interview, Ann reflects on how the wellness industry has changed over her 24 years of being in business. We take a deep dive into one of their core services – biometric screenings. Ann explains how they approach screenings differently than other companies by incorporating intrinsic coaching, with the goal of making screenings more human.

We talk openly about the friction between those who advocate to get rid of screenings and her belief in them. Ann describes her efforts to build a company where people bring their best selves to work and she leaves us with a tangible tip.

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Do you want a short summary of each week’s podcast? Each week, I send out an email that goes one step further than the interview. It’s my reflection of what I pulled out of the interview and at least one tip (and usually more) about how you can apply all the goodness to your work and life. If that sounds good, you can sign up HERE.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Jul 17, 2019

No matter how successful, rich or high on the corporate ladder we are, Dr. Bowen White says we all have a secret we share. It’s not a secret we talk about but it’s one we bring with us to work, into relationships and imprint on our kids. This secret can get in the way of having the life that is only yours to live.

Dr. Bowen White built his career as a physician who breaks down barriers between him and his patients. He now works with organizations using a combination of the talents and expertise of a physician, speaker, consultant, and author. 

As an organizational physician Bowen is interested in the people piece of the workplace puzzle. He is a founding board member for the National Institute for Play and is the author “Why Normal Isn’t Healthy”.  

In this interview, Bowen tells us how he created his own path to practice holistic medicine, when and why he transitioned to working with organizations and lets us in on his definition of health. He then explains why normal isn’t healthy and describes this secret we all share. Bowen leaves us with the most beautiful (and tangible) tip I’ve heard so far. 

If you’re ready to hear from a physician who takes himself off the “doctor pedestal” and who exposes our deepest insecurity as human beings, this is the episode for you! 

Want more?

Do you want a short summary of each week’s podcast? Each week, I send out an email that goes one step further than the interview. It’s my reflection of what I pulled out of the interview and at least one tip (and usually more) about how you can apply all the goodness to your work and life. If that sounds good, you can sign up HERE.

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Jul 10, 2019

The word “happy” can be such a loaded one. It conjures up an overly chipper person that no matter the circumstance, they see rainbows and unicorns. Luckily, podcast guest, Nataly Kogan, tells us that being happy doesn’t mean being positive all of the time.

Nataly Kogan is an entrepreneur, speaker, and author whose mission is ​to help millions of people optimize their emotional health. ​She reached the highest levels of corporate success at McKinsey and Microsoft, and at 26 became a managing director in venture capital. But she was burned out from juggling non-stop work and family responsibilities and felt unfulfilled.

Her journey to find meaningful, lasting happiness along with the discovery of scientific research on emotional well-being led her to found Happier. Nataly believes happiness is not this big prize on the horizon that we can work hard to achieve. Rather, happiness is a skill we can practice.

In today’s interview, Nataly tells her story of fleeing the former Soviet Union and coming to the U.S. as a refugee and her search for what she calls the “big happy”. She tells us how this search led her to create Happier and walks us through the 3 principles and 5 core skills of the Happier Method. Nataly explains how her life is different now than in her previous corporate life and she leaves us with a tangible tip (or two).

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

Jul 3, 2019

Most people know they should eat more vegetables, exercise and sleep at least 7 hours a night but unfortunately, knowledge doesn’t equate to behavior. Research suggests we tend to make daily health decisions based on emotions and in the moment instead of according to logic. We’ll make the choice based on how we feel.

Today’s guest is Dr. Michelle Segar, a motivational scientist who has been studying what motivates people to choose and maintain healthy behaviors, particularly around exercise. She believes that motivation isn’t the cause. It’s actually the result.

In this interview, we discuss what a motivational scientist actually does, how we can shrink the goals we’re asking people to achieve (at least at the beginning) and reframe exercise from a chore to a gift.

Michelle gives her thoughts on external motivators like gift cards and financial incentives. She leaves us with a tangible tip to assess the reasons we give employees to participate….are they based on logic?

Links mentioned:

Join me at the Wellness Council of Wisconsin in September! Click here for more info.

Brian Wansink study about exercise fun vs walk.

White paper health promoters stop promoting – can request via this webpage

Website: http://michellesegar.com/

For links mentioned in today's episode visit: http://bit.ly/Redesignpod

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